New observations suggest the Universe might be expanding at a higher rate than we thought

New observations suggest the Universe might be expanding at a higher rate than we thought
Credit: pngimg (edited)
Studying maser emissions from distant galaxies could assist researchers seeking to understand the expansion of the Universe. Image credit: Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF
The distance to M 106–20 million light years — is known with great precision due to masers in that system.
The methods astronomers use to measure distances to far-flung objects. Image credit: NASA, ESA, A. Feild (STScI), and A. Riess (STScI/JHU)
Galaxies MCG+01–38–004 (upper) and MCG+01–38–005 (lower) are sites of where masers can be detected, leading to accurate measurements of the Hubble constant. Image credit: ESA/Hubble

This article was originally published on The Cosmic Companion by James Maynard, founder and publisher of The Cosmic Companion. He is a New England native turned desert rat in Tucson, where he lives with his lovely wife, Nicole, and Max the Cat. You can read this original piece here.

Astronomy News with The Cosmic Companion is also available as a weekly podcast, carried on all major podcast providers. Tune in every Tuesday for updates on the latest astronomy news, and interviews with astronomers and other researchers working to uncover the nature of the Universe.

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