The Hygiene Hand touches dirty surfaces so you won’t have to

The Hygiene Hand touches dirty surfaces so you won’t have to

TLDR: Made from solid antimicrobial brass, the multi-functional Hygiene Hand can push buttons, open doors and more.

Without getting too alarmist, it’s hard not to be a budding germaphobe these days. Between countertops, elevator buttons, credit card readers and just the friendly neighborhood building door handle, it’s tough not to instinctively recoil from touching just about anything right now.

With all those concerns floating around, adding an instrument to your EDC stash to handle those various world interacting functions is becoming a smarter and smarter alternative. Since you really don’t want to be poking, pushing or pulling anything right now, the Hygiene Hand Antimicrobial Brass Door Opener and Stylus can serve as a brilliant stand-in for your fingers. You can get one now for $19.99, a $5 savings from TNW Deals.

Designed by a retired New York City paramedic, the Hygiene Hand is made entirely from a solid piece of antimicrobial brass to help decrease the spread of germs while performing some of your everyday tasks.

The flat stylus tip has a large enough surface to emulate a finger. It’s strong enough to press buttons, key in information to an ATM or even sign your name on a touch screen. Meanwhile, it’s also got a door hook to easily pull handles and doors, all with a solid finger hole that is easy to use while still being maneuverable. 

As you’d expect right now, Kickstarter supporters went nuts for this simple, yet ultra-practical device, funding its production to the tune of nearly $600,000.

Of course, as great as the Hygiene Hand is, it isn’t magic. You should absolutely still wash your hands and wear a mask when venturing into public spaces, as the CDC directs.

Right now, you can pick up a single Hygiene Hand for just $19.99 (regularly $25); or you can pick up a handy two-pack for only $37.99, a 24 percent savings.

Prices are subject to change.

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