This portable attachment that adds a second monitor to your laptop anywhere is on sale

This portable attachment that adds a second monitor to your laptop anywhere is on sale

TLDR: Get the second office monitor setup on your favorite laptop with this lightweight, efficient Mobile Pixels DUEX monitor at 27% off.

At TNW Deals, we see it all. But every once in a while, a new product comes through the door and makes us stop and think, “Boy, why didn’t somebody come up with this idea years ago?”

Many offices come equipped with dual monitor workstations to boost productivity. But in an era where more and more employees are working at home or from the road, a second monitor for a laptop has never been very feasible.

That is, until a pair of MIT students formed Mobile Pixels and launched the DUEX Pro Portable 1080p Monitor, available now at almost $70 off the regular price, just $180 from TNW Deals with promo code “BFSAVE15” at checkout.

It’s an ingenious innovation that’s already raised over $1 million in IndieGoGo funding — and it isn’t hard to see why. This lightweight, durable and energy-efficient laptop monitor clips to the back of your laptop with magnetic adhesives, connects with a single USB cable, then slides out to offer a fully functional second screen anywhere you want to work.

Fully compatible with any laptop model, the screen can also flip around 180 degrees to become a separate display monitor for presentations. With the DUEX, you can lead a meeting or present data without an overhead projector, screen casting or constantly turning your laptop around for your audience.

With promo code “BFSAVE15” save current 27% off deal, it’s a perfect holiday gift price point for students, working professionals or really anyone who wants the second screen experience in this on-the-go world.

Don’t wait for Black Friday—you can get these top-sellers at deep discounts today!

Prices are subject to change.

 

Mobile Pixels DUEX Pro Portable Dual Monitor – $211

Get working smarter for $211

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