You’ll never be embarrassed by writing errors again with WhiteSmoke… and it’s over 80% off

You’ll never be embarrassed by writing errors again with WhiteSmoke… and it’s over 80% ...

All you’ve got is your credibility. Without it, you’re sunk. And if you’re looking for a faster way to watch your credibility plummet with virtually anyone, just go ahead and send out an email littered with spelling errors, ridiculous grammar, and misused punctuation. The message to any reader, be it a friend, business associate, or a stranger, is clear: the writer does shoddy, substandard work…and they may not be very smart, to boot.

That’s never the impression you want to make on anyone. WhiteSmoke can help make sure your writing is as clean and error-free as it should be. Right now, you can get a lifetime of access to WhiteSmoke’s premium services for only $69.99 from TNW Deals. That’s over 80 percent off its regular price.

WhiteSmoke is like having your old English teacher reading every word you write on any of your devices…without the withering judgment, of course.

WhiteSmoke not only catches all your typos and syntax issues, it actually contextualizes your writing, then offers recommendations for corrections and improvements. Rather than just fixing all your errors, WhiteSmoke breaks down your work using state-of-the-art artificial intelligence algorithms, suggesting templates for improvement, and even offering tutorials to make sure your prose are always structurally sound and stylistically sharp.

It’s one of the only writing aids that actually leaves your work better than you ever imagined it could be.

WhiteSmoke works on desktop PCs as well as mobile devices and even comes with a translator to make you sound like a true wordsmith in up to 50 different languages.

A lifetime subscription with WhiteSmoke is a $400 value, but if you take advantage of this offer before it runs out, you’ll get this award-winning software for just $69.99.

Get this deal

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