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This article was published on November 18, 2013


Supercomputing startup PiCloud joins Dropbox, but its service will live on as an open source project

Supercomputing startup PiCloud joins Dropbox, but its service will live on as an open source project
Jon Russell
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Jon Russell

Jon Russell was Asia Editor for The Next Web from 2011 to 2014. Originally from the UK, he lives in Bangkok, Thailand. You can find him on T Jon Russell was Asia Editor for The Next Web from 2011 to 2014. Originally from the UK, he lives in Bangkok, Thailand. You can find him on Twitter, Angel List, LinkedIn.

Dropbox has added more expertise to its bench after snapping up the team from PiCloud, a platform that enables high performance computing, batch processing and scientific computing applications from the cloud, in an undisclosed deal.

In a blog post, PiCloud explains that it is joining the cloud storage giant because “the industry we’ve chosen is not ready for the fast-paced growth demanded by a venture-backed business.” Instead, the team will bring its expertise and experience to Dropbox, where it hopes to “ease and accelerate developer access to one of the greatest collections of data in the world.”

The service will shut down on February 25, but it will live on beyond that as an open source project run by Multyvac, a soon-to-launch independent company.

PiCloud raised $1.4 million from Greylock Partners, KPCB, Andreessen Horowitz and other investors back in 2010.

➤ PiCloud has joined Dropbox [PiCloud Blog]

Related: Full-service selling app Sold shuts down as the team joins Dropbox

Image via Ian Lamont / Flickr

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