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This article was published on September 24, 2012


    Mformation, the firm that tried and failed to make RIM pay $147.2m for patents, gets bought

    Mformation, the firm that tried and failed to make RIM pay $147.2m for patents, gets bought Image by: Artur Marciniec - Fotolia
    Robin Wauters
    Story by

    Robin Wauters

    Robin Wauters is the European Editor of The Next Web. He describes himself as a hopeless cyberflâneur, a lover of startups, his family a Robin Wauters is the European Editor of The Next Web. He describes himself as a hopeless cyberflâneur, a lover of startups, his family and Belgian beer. If you'd like to know more about Robin, head on over to robinwauters.com or follow him on Twitter.

    Remember Mformation Technologies, the provider of mobile device management software solutions that initially won a $147.2 million patent lawsuit against Research In Motion (RIM), only to see the verdict overturned less than a month later?

    Well, today word got out that private investment firm Clearlake Capital Group has acquired the firm in an asset deal.

    Terms of the deal were not shared, but Clearlake says it will be pumping an undisclosed amount of fresh capital into Mformation (which is now the company’s full name, sans ‘Technologies’) and that its management team and operations will “largely remain the same”.

    Earlier this month, Clearlake also acquired NetMotion Wireless, a provider of mobile virtual private network (VPN) and network performance management software solutions.

    Mformation’s solution enables mobile operators, managed service providers and enterprises to manage, support and secure all types of mobile devices, across all network types, remotely. The company claims that it has more than 500 million devices under management and over 50 service provider and enterprise MSP customers.

    RIM was originally ordered to pay a whopping $8 royalty for every BlackBerry device connected to its enterprise server software in a wireless patent lawsuit brought on by Mformation back in 2008.

    Theoretically, Mformation can still appeal the recent overturning of that verdict, but since a jury had vacated the $147.2 million award, it would basically have to start litigating from scratch.

    That seems unlikely under the wings of its new owners.