The heart of tech

This article was published on July 14, 2012


    RIM may appeal $147.2m verdict in patent lawsuit, says it will await further rulings before deciding

    RIM may appeal $147.2m verdict in patent lawsuit, says it will await further rulings before deciding Image by: zimmytws - Fotolia
    Robin Wauters
    Story by

    Robin Wauters

    Robin Wauters is the European Editor of The Next Web. He describes himself as a hopeless cyberflâneur, a lover of startups, his family a Robin Wauters is the European Editor of The Next Web. He describes himself as a hopeless cyberflâneur, a lover of startups, his family and Belgian beer. If you'd like to know more about Robin, head on over to robinwauters.com or follow him on Twitter.

    TroubledResearch In Motion (RIM) took another blow yesterday, after it was ordered to pay an $8 royalty to a company called Mformation for every BlackBerry device connected to its enterprise server software.

    As a result of a wireless patent lawsuit brought on by Mformation back in 2008, RIM has been directed to cough up $147.2 million in total (based on 18.4 million BlackBerry units sold in the United States).

    This morning, RIM responded to the Northern California jury verdict with a press release on Marketwire. Unsurprisingly, the company says it is “disappointed by the outcome” and that it is “evaluating all legal options”.

    RIM points out that the trial judge has yet to decide certain legal issues that might impact the verdict, and that the company will await those rulings before deciding whether to pursue an appeal. The beleaguered BlackBerry device maker goes on to question the validity of Mformation’s patent-in-suit.

    Mformation’s attorney, meanwhile, told Bloomberg that damages for future sales outside the United States, and to government customers, may end up increasing the amount RIM has to pay up “by two to three times”.

    To be continued, no doubt.

    Also read:

    RIM reports revenues of $2.8 billion in its first quarter, loses $0.99 per share, plans to cut 5,000 jobs

    Why on earth would anyone want to join RIM now? We ask someone who just did