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This article was published on August 3, 2012


As paid apps go live in Windows 8, Microsoft details how it will pay developers

As paid apps go live in Windows 8, Microsoft details how it will pay developers
Alex Wilhelm
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Alex Wilhelm

Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected] Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected]

Windows 8 is done, and as promised, the ability to publish paid applications is now a go. However, you can’t publish paid apps unless you do so from a copy of the RTM build of the operating system. For developers, that means waiting until the 15th, at the earliest.

Still, TNW has learned that there are in fact a number of paid apps, apps that cost money to download, in the Windows Store right now, including: Sudoku, Baby Soothers, Feed Reader, Growth Tracker and Flashcards. It isn’t clear if Microsoft allowed those apps early access, or their developers simply found a quick route and open into the Windows Store.

To answer questions that are surely cropping up, Microsoft detailed the process behind getting paid today. Essentially, provided that you are sentient enough to sign your name, you should be able to handle the process without any real issue. It’s an I9 form for US citizens, and an I8 for everyone else.

One note: depending on where you are, your payment will be sent to your account via “electronic funds transfer, SEPA transfer, or wire,” meaning that people are going to pay different fees, depending on the method that is used.

Other important things to know is that you need around $200 in accumulated sales to be paid, and transactions that are ‘pending’ don’t count. That means that a sale is “generally not eligible for payment until 30 days after the purchase occurred.” And finally, you have to reach $200 in sales, which means revenue before Microsoft takes its cut. Sell $200, and Microsoft takes 30%, or $60.

Quite simple, really. Now, there just may be ways to get your hands on that Windows 8 RTM build, if you are looking to get a move on.

Top Image Credit: Images Money

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