Mailbox has finally ditched the reservation system for its mobile email client today, giving anyone with an iOS device the chance to download the app and see what all the fuss is about.

The team said that after 10 weeks of “around-the-clock” work, the service has been scaled to the point where it can now handle over 100 million messages per day. Although it’s impossible to know quite how many people will be downloading the app over the next few weeks, Mailbox is confident they’ll be able to handle new users as they sign up.

It should come as a welcome relief to all those who looked at the notoriously long wait queues and either signed-up begrudgingly or gave up entirely.

The app has been praised – including in our own review – for its fresh approach to email consumption on the move. For every mail item, users can choose to either archive it, delete it or delay a decision until later.

It’s a task management experience that is designed to help smartphone owners quickly deal with email quickly without the strain and weight associated with multiple folders, half-written responses and unopened messages.

The hype around Mailbox skyrocketed however when cloud-based storage provider Dropbox acquired the company in the tail end of March. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed, but at that time Mailbox was already processing over 60 million emails each day.

Mailbox then announced that it had hit 1 million total reservations which, while impressive, was also soul-destroying to those users who were hoping that the relentless interest might die down soon.

Only yesterday, Mailbox updated its iOS app to version 1.2.0, adding additional improvements such as the ability to swipe multiple mail items at once, numerous UI improvements and adjustments to the app’s snooze feature.

The new version of Mailbox should be available on the App Store now, without the aforementioned ball and chain reservation system. Enjoy.

➤ Mailbox | iOS

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