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This article was published on February 19, 2015


    Yik Yak updated with improved reporting process for abusive posts

    Yik Yak updated with improved reporting process for abusive posts
    Roberto Baldwin
    Story by

    Roberto Baldwin

    Roberto Baldwin was a reporter for The Next Web in San Francisco between April 2014 and March 2015. Roberto Baldwin was a reporter for The Next Web in San Francisco between April 2014 and March 2015.

    Quasi-anonymous posting service Yik Yak is trying to make it easier to report abusive posts and let users change their minds while voting.

    Today’s update adds options when flagging a post. The four choices are now: “Offensive content,” “This post targets someone,” “Spam” and “Other.”

    2015-02-19 13.53.35Previously, reporting a post just asked if the post was breaking one of Yik Yak’s rules. By adding context, it could help the company make a quicker decision if a post should be pulled from the system.

    Yik Yak quickly became home to online bullying thanks to its localized posts and anonymous nature. The company has been working to keep bullying off the app and today’s update is another step towards that goal.

    Users can also now change their vote on a post. If you voted something up, you can now decide that’s not worth your kudos and instead vote it down.

    Yik Yak [iOS/Android]