The party is ON! Join us at TNW Conference 2021 in Amsterdam for face-to-face business!

The heart of tech

This article was published on October 7, 2015

    Volvo is prepared to accept ‘full liability’ if one of its self-driving cars crashes

    Volvo is prepared to accept ‘full liability’ if one of its self-driving cars crashes
    Nate Swanner
    Story by

    Nate Swanner

    Former Reporter, TNW

    TNW's former West Coast writer in the PNW (Portland, Oregon). Nate loves amplifying developers, and codes in Swift when he's not writing. If TNW's former West Coast writer in the PNW (Portland, Oregon). Nate loves amplifying developers, and codes in Swift when he's not writing. If you need to get in touch, Twitter is your best bet.

    As autonomous car manufacturers like Google shift blame when it comes to accidents, Volvo is taking the high road — and the blame.

    If a Volvo self-driving car gets into an accident, the company will “accept full liability.”

    One of the reasons it can accept responsibility is that Volvo has taken steps to protect its underlying software, which is protected by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). In a statement, Volvo also said it regards hacking its vehicles to be a criminal offense.

    Volvo is encouraging the federal government to regulate self-driving cars, rather than leave it to individual states. At a seminar on self-driving cars tomorrow, Volvo President and Chief Executive Håkan Samuelsson will urge the US to end its “patchwork” system of regulating autonomous cars.

    It’s a bold step for Volvo to make, but reducing the responsibility of a “driver” may cause us to be too trusting of an autonomous cars’ ability.

    US urged to establish nationwide Federal guidelines for autonomous driving [Volvo]