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This article was published on September 18, 2009

    Twones tracks all the music you listen to. Online and off. [Invites baby]

    Twones tracks all the music you listen to. Online and off. [Invites baby]
    Zee
    Story by

    Zee

    Former CEO of The Next Web. A fan of startups, entrepreneurship, getting things done faster, penning the occasional blog post, taking photos Former CEO of The Next Web. A fan of startups, entrepreneurship, getting things done faster, penning the occasional blog post, taking photos, designing, listening to good music and making lurrrve.

    Picture 14Out of Amsterdam comes Twones, a Last.fm like web music service  with one crucial difference, the service tracks all of the music you listen on your desktop and 25+ online music sites.

    How you may ask? Via a neat little Firefox/Internet Explorer extension. The extension makes tracking music on your favorite music sites and desktop players including Winamp, iTunes and Windows Media Player a breeze. You will however need to keep Firefox open to keep tracking your desktop music, a little awkward.

    Picture 15

    Similar to Last.fm, the service makes it easy to browse information on the artists you’re listening to, gives you up-to-the-minute tour schedules and also allows you to track the artist’s buzz on Twitter.

    Twones also aims to become a music discovery tool of sorts by creating an “on air” section, that lets you listen to music your friends are listening to. If you want to share a song or even a playlist you made in Twones with your friends in the outside world, Twones makes it easy by adding a “Tweet” button.

    Twones is currently in an invite-only beta, but we’ve got a couple of thousand invites to give away. Just visit this link and type in TNW.

    [Disclosure: Twones offices keeps the same offices as TheNextWeb and is part of TheNextWeb Incubator. But please don’t take just our word for it, check out Lifehacker, Webware and Mashable’s recommendations.]