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This article was published on July 28, 2015


    The NSA will begin losing access to phone record metadata on November 29

    The NSA will begin losing access to phone record metadata on November 29 Image by: SAUL LOEB
    Nate Swanner
    Story by

    Nate Swanner

    Former Reporter, TNW

    TNW's former West Coast writer in the PNW (Portland, Oregon). Nate loves amplifying developers, and codes in Swift when he's not writing. If TNW's former West Coast writer in the PNW (Portland, Oregon). Nate loves amplifying developers, and codes in Swift when he's not writing. If you need to get in touch, Twitter is your best bet.

    The NSA will soon lose access to phone records it is in possession of, but the data isn’t going away. On November 29, the agency can no longer reference the call logs or gather further data, but must keep it handy for ongoing litigation.

    After late November, only “technical personnel” will have access to the data — but only for the purpose of monitoring the “integrity” of that info, and only for three months.

    The data will be stored until pending civil litigation is settled, “or the relevant courts relieve NSA of such obligations.” The NSA says it plans to destroy the data as soon as possible.

    November 29 may be a turning point for the NSA and bulk collection of phone metadata, but the fact that such info remains on-file and accessible is bound to leave some uneasy until it’s removed forever.

    IC on the record [via The Verge]

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