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This article was published on January 22, 2016

See the SpaceX capsule designed to hold actual living people

See the SpaceX capsule designed to hold actual living people
Lauren Hockenson
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Lauren Hockenson

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Lauren is a reporter for The Next Web, based in San Francisco. She covers the key players that make the tech ecosystem what it is right now. Lauren is a reporter for The Next Web, based in San Francisco. She covers the key players that make the tech ecosystem what it is right now. She also has a folder full of dog GIFs and uses them liberally on Twitter at @lhockenson.

SpaceX is definitely on a roll with its tests. After a successful round trip in Florida and another (less successful) water landing attempt, the company released a video testing the ‘Dragon 2’. This is an important step, since SpaceX plans on putting actual humans inside of one.

The pod, which did a timed hover test to check its eight ‘SuperDraco’ thrusters, is designed to create force and hover to sustain things like safe crew landing. In the long run, that will be the final piece to the Falcon 9 rocket that actually makes it habitable for a human crew. If everything goes smoothly, that day will actually come sometime in 2017.

The test, which happened in November, was a five second hover that generated around 33,000 pounds of thrust.

SpaceXPod2

When the test concluded, the slo-mo captured the lingering flames on the pod.

Neat.

Of course, SpaceX still has a long road ahead before it begins actual manned spaceflight operations. But in a not too distant future, you might get into a pod for a round-trip on commercial spaceflight.

Dragon 2 Propulsive Hover Test [Youtube]