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This article was published on June 11, 2013

    Royalty makes its way to Wayra London for the launch of its first Enternships careers fair

    Royalty makes its way to Wayra London for the launch of its first Enternships careers fair
    Ben Woods
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    Ben Woods

    Europe Editor

    Ben is a technology journalist with a specialism in mobile devices and a geeky love of mobile spectrum issues. Ben used to be a professional Ben is a technology journalist with a specialism in mobile devices and a geeky love of mobile spectrum issues. Ben used to be a professional online poker player. You can contact him via Twitter or on Google+.

    His Royal Highness (HRH) The Duke of York Prince Andrew stopped by at the Telefónica-backed Wayra startup accelerator in London today to celebrate the launch of the organisation’s first careers fair run in association with Enternships.

    Wayra, based in central London, invited 100 of the UK’s “most ambitious young” graduates and undergraduates from the “UK’s best universities” to come face-to-face with the tech founders, CTOs and other team members of the startups in the academy in a bid to give a better idea of what it is like to work as part of a startup.

    “Initiatives such as this one are incredibly important if we are to help nurture and develop the next generation and empower them to reap the benefits of technology,” Ronan Dunne, CEO of Telefónica UK, said. “Wayra Enternships provides the perfect platform to help drive our economic recovery by partnering young talent with the very best digital startups in the UK.”

    The Wayra Enternships programme was designed to give recent, or soon to be, graduates a chance of working with some “of the most incredible digital startups in the world”, Telefónica said.

    The initiative is a part of Telefónica’s Wayra-related goals, which include building a Telefónica Think Big community of more than 300,000 young people and enrolling 50,000 students in its Think Big school aimed at teaching digital literacy skills such as coding and robotics by 2015.

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