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This article was published on December 11, 2013

    Rdio brings its music streaming service to 20 new markets, now up to 51 countries worldwide

    Rdio brings its music streaming service to 20 new markets, now up to 51 countries worldwide Image by: Ian Waldie
    Nick Summers
    Story by

    Nick Summers

    Nick Summers is a technology journalist for The Next Web. He writes on all sorts of topics, although he has a passion for gadgets, apps and Nick Summers is a technology journalist for The Next Web. He writes on all sorts of topics, although he has a passion for gadgets, apps and video games in particular. You can reach him on Twitter, circle him on Google+ and connect with him on LinkedIn.

    Rdio is now available in 20 new markets around the world, greatly increasing the reach and potential user base for its cross-platform, on-demand music streaming service.

    The new regions are: Argentina, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Israel, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Rdio is now available in 51 countries, spanning six continents around the world. Today’s expansion marks its first entry into Africa, and makes Rdio the second largest music streaming service – Deezer still holds that mantle – in regards to the number of countries where listeners can tune in.

    We’re expecting a high-profile announcement from Spotify, arguably Rdio’s biggest competitor, later today. The WSJ reported that it would be launching a free, ad-supported version of its service for mobile users, which would be a vital differentiator against Rdio and Deezer.

    Regardless, today’s expansion shows that Rdio, which recently appointed ex-Amazon exec Anthony Bay as its new CEO, is ready to go toe-to-toe.

    ➤ Rdio Expands to 20 New Territories: Now Available in 51 Countries

    Image Credit: Ian Waldie/Getty Images