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This article was published on September 24, 2012

    On a mission to ‘simplify IT infrastructure’, SimpliVity lands $25m from KPCB, Accel and CRV

    On a mission to ‘simplify IT infrastructure’, SimpliVity lands $25m from KPCB, Accel and CRV Image by: Zoltán Pataki - Fotolia
    Robin Wauters
    Story by

    Robin Wauters

    Robin Wauters is the European Editor of The Next Web. He describes himself as a hopeless cyberflâneur, a lover of startups, his family a Robin Wauters is the European Editor of The Next Web. He describes himself as a hopeless cyberflâneur, a lover of startups, his family and Belgian beer. If you'd like to know more about Robin, head on over to robinwauters.com or follow him on Twitter.

    SimpliVity, a Westborough, Massachusetts-based technology startup, has secured $25 million in Series B funding from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB), with prior backers Accel Partners and Charles River Ventures participating in the round.

    SimpliVity was established in late 2009, its ambitious mission to simplify IT infrastructure management, and investors have pumped $43 million into the company to date.

    The startup, which just recently came out of stealth mode, provides – and I quote – “Software Defined Data Center in a Box solutions”.

    Its flagship offering, OmniCube, is an assimilated IT infrastructure platform that SimpliVity claims was purpose-designed for today’s virtualized, cloud-enabled world.

    OmniCube is essentially a 2U rack-mounted IT infrastructure building block.

    Put two or more OmniCube systems together and they form what SimpliVity calls an “OmniCube Global Federation”, a scalable pool of shared resources that was built to enable efficient data movement and system availability.

    The ‘data center in a box’ solution provides a range of functionalities, including enterprise computing, storage services and networking. SimpliVity asserts that the underlying technology of its solution, dubbed OmniStack, includes 10 patent-pending innovations.

    SimpliVity argues that OmniCube could basically replace the computing infrastructure that companies typically use to store and retrieve data.

    The company is thus taking on juggernauts like EMC, which is interesting in itself because chairman and CEO Doron Kempel used to serve as Vice President and General Manager at its rival.

    He later co-founded Diligent Technologies, which was acquired by IBM for up to $200 million in April 2008.

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