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This article was published on June 26, 2012

    MIT’s new software can detect your vital signs with just a video camera

    MIT’s new software can detect your vital signs with just a video camera
    Harrison Weber
    Story by

    Harrison Weber

    Harrison Weber is TNW's Features Editor in NYC. Part writer, part designer. Stay in touch: Twitter @harrisonweber, Google+ and Email. Harrison Weber is TNW's Features Editor in NYC. Part writer, part designer. Stay in touch: Twitter @harrisonweber, Google+ and Email.

    MIT researchers have released a video detailing new software that is able to amplify variations in successive frames of video that are imperceptible to the naked eye. In other words, this technique, named “Eulerian Video Magnification,” is able to detect patterns (of color and movement) that reveal quite a lot about you, including: your heart rate, breathing patterns and how your blood circulates.

    More than anything, EVM has immense potential for drastically improving telemedicine. That said, the software also brings casual video recordings a step further in terms of intimacy — introducing the risk of revealing detailed information about your health simply by going on camera.

    Check it out below:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=Fpv0CWLouzc

    EVM was developed by Michael Rubinstein, Hao-Yu Wu, Eugene Shih, William Freeman, Fredo Durand and John Guttag. For more, check out the following link:

    ➤ Eulerian Video Magnification