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This article was published on January 5, 2012


    MIAmobi’s line of tablet and phone bags completely knock you off the grid

    MIAmobi’s line of tablet and phone bags completely knock you off the grid
    Harrison Weber
    Story by

    Harrison Weber

    Harrison Weber is TNW's Features Editor in NYC. Part writer, part designer. Stay in touch: Twitter @harrisonweber, Google+ and Email. Harrison Weber is TNW's Features Editor in NYC. Part writer, part designer. Stay in touch: Twitter @harrisonweber, Google+ and Email.

    MIAmobi, created by J.R Zar Inc, is a line of bags that block cell reception, RFID and GPS signals, keeping any device “safe and undetectable.”

    Placing your phone into a MIAmobi bag completely blocks data from coming in or out — something that is normally impossible to guarantee for phones without removable batteries (like the iPhone). Because your phone will have no way of transferring information, you’re kept safe from RFID hacks and even questionable tactics used by cellphone companies.

    Besides protecting your data, there’s a built-in benefit to habitually disconnecting yourself. Our lives are filled with a constant flow of information, and sometimes it’s best for our minds to simply cut everything off. These bags make it easy to physically separate yourself from the digital world, if only for a moment. Also, because of the way data is shielded, the company claims that the bags can protect against radiation.

    There’s one more feature: MIAmobi’s bags are lined with Silver Nano, which kills bateria that could be residing on your devices. Silver nanoparticles are often used in household products like washing machines and refrigerators in Samsung products.

    MIAmobi isn’t the only company releasing this sort of product, but it seems to be the most accessible and even a little fashionable. My bet is that bags like these will continue to become more commonplace as privacy concerns grow in an increasingly technical society.

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