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This article was published on January 16, 2014


    Location-based service Banjo overhauls its mobile apps to display social posts sorted by live events

    Location-based service Banjo overhauls its mobile apps to display social posts sorted by live events Image by: Lisa Maree Williams
    Ken Yeung
    Story by

    Ken Yeung

    Ken Yeung is a reporter for The Next Web based in San Francisco, CA. He carries around a big camera & likes to write about tech, startup Ken Yeung is a reporter for The Next Web based in San Francisco, CA. He carries around a big camera & likes to write about tech, startups, parties, and interesting people. Follow him on Twitter, on Facebook, and Google+.

    Location-based service Banjo underwent a transformation today. It overhauled its mobile apps today across all devices, no longer curating content by individuals, but rather by events. The company has also redesigned the interface of its apps to make them more intuitive, building them from the ground up for iOS 7 and Android 4.4 KitKat.

    The most significant aspect of Banjo 4.0 is the curation of content. When the service launched in 2012, it competed alongside the likes of Sonar and Highlight, but evolved to focus on just location. Users could see what others were publicly sharing across various social networks in locations around the world. Today, the app gets more specific — it displays results based on location and the event taking place there (e.g. the Winter Olympics in Sochi, the Golden Globes in Los Angeles, etc.).

    01-Home

    Damien Patton, Banjo’s CEO and founder, says: “We are witnessing a transformation in the way content is created and consumed. This perfect storm is being fed by the convergence of three powerful and distinct forces: Mobile + Social + Cloud = Real Time Web.”

    He believes that just looking at data by location is uninteresting and mainstream audiences want more. Waze is proof of this theory since it focuses on location and traffic. To that end, Banjo is looking at content across two dimensions. Users will be able to pull up any public photos, videos, and posts as it relates to any event happening around the world.

    04-Event

    Banjo isn’t disclosing how its technology can pinpoint when a live event is taking place — it’s only attributing it to its secret algorithm.

    The company has rewritten all five of its mobile apps — yes, five — one each for iOS, iPad, Android phone, and supported Android 7-inch and 10-inch tablets. However, there remains but one SDK for developers.

    Patton also shared with us some statistics about Banjo users: to date the app has been downloaded more than 6 million times and the average time spent on the app was over 4 minutes per session. It has also curated 9 billion posts in this version so far.

    ➤ Banjo for iOS | Android

    Photo credit: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images