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This article was published on December 24, 2011


    GoDaddy lost 21,054 domains yesterday in wake of SOPA PR disaster

    GoDaddy lost 21,054 domains yesterday in wake of SOPA PR disaster
    Drew Olanoff
    Story by

    Drew Olanoff

    Drew Olanoff was The Next Web's West Coast Editor. He coined the phrase "Social Good" and invented the "donation by action" model for onlin Drew Olanoff was The Next Web's West Coast Editor. He coined the phrase "Social Good" and invented the "donation by action" model for online charitable movements. He founded #BlameDrewsCancer. You can follow him on Twitter, Google+, Facebook, or email [email protected]

    It’s going to get worse before it gets better for domain registration company GoDaddy. Yesterday, we reported that GoDaddy had reversed its decision to support SOPA. Its customer service reps are even taking to the phones to beg you to keep your domains with the company.

    It looks like these PR moves to save face, and business, are completely futile. According to TheDomains, 21,054 domains were transferred away from GoDaddy on Friday alone. At $6.99 a pop, that would make for a loss of $147,167, not taking future renewals into account. The day before wasn’t a good one for the company either, with 15,000 people taking their domains elsewhere. That means that even though GoDaddy changed its stance, people have had enough.

    The stats from DailyChanges show that the transfers away from GoDaddy have been increasing all week. Here are the number of domains moving away from GoDaddy this week alone:

    Monday (8,800)
    Tuesday (13,000)
    Wednesday (14,500)
    Thursday (15,000)
    Friday (21,054)

    Just a suggestion, perhaps GoDaddy should write about SOPA and leave the comments open, that way customers can reply. I’m starting to run out of /facepalm photos, so it better do something to repair its relationship with customers.

    Oh, and by the way GoDaddy…we know that you’re exempt from SOPA, and that you haven’t even officially changed your stance with Congress.

    If you’re not sure what the Stop Online Piracy Act is, read SOPA For Dummies