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This article was published on January 29, 2014


    Flipboard redesigns Cover Stories to help surface interesting content from your subscriptions

    Flipboard redesigns Cover Stories to help surface interesting content from your subscriptions
    Ken Yeung
    Story by

    Ken Yeung

    Ken Yeung is a reporter for The Next Web based in San Francisco, CA. He carries around a big camera & likes to write about tech, startup Ken Yeung is a reporter for The Next Web based in San Francisco, CA. He carries around a big camera & likes to write about tech, startups, parties, and interesting people. Follow him on Twitter, on Facebook, and Google+.

    Flipboard is giving itself a bit of a makeover today. The company announced that it is reorganizing the way content is featured within its Cover Stories and The Weekend sections. By doing so, it hopes users will be able to quickly “catch up with the highlights” while also diving deeper into the stories that they find interesting.

    Flipboard has always been like a magazine rack, filled with digital publications that users could quickly subscribe to and read through on their digital device. However, like in the print world, when you have too many magazines to read, how can you find out what’s important and relevant to you?

    NewCoverStories

    With some similarities to Facebook’s News Feed, Flipboard is using an algorithm that will display a “super condensed” overview of your subscriptions. Articles will be surfaced based on how frequently you visit the section. It also highlights the app’s “Flips by Friends” feature which shows you interesting stories that friends have been sharing on social media — definitely as a new way to aid in discovering new content.

    Over time, the service will learn about your reading behavior and display content from sections you read the most.

    TheWeekendSports

    As mentioned earlier, this new organizational structure will be available on Cover Stories (Flipboard’s most widely read section) and The Weekend. It will be available on both tablets and smartphones, but only for iOS and Android devices. BlackBerry and Windows Phone versions may be coming soon.

    Not everyone will receive this update right away. The company says it is doing a “slow rollout” to make sure that it scales efficiently and performs as expected.

    Photo credit: Flipboard