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This article was published on March 30, 2009

    Help us define our advertising strategy

    Help us define our advertising strategy
    Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten
    Story by

    Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten

    Founder & board member, TNW

    Boris is a serial entrepreneur who founded not only TNW, but also V3 Redirect Services (sold), HubHop Wireless Internet Provider (sold), and Boris is a serial entrepreneur who founded not only TNW, but also V3 Redirect Services (sold), HubHop Wireless Internet Provider (sold), and pr.co. Boris is very active on Twitter as @Boris and Instagram: @Boris.

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    Illustration by WillDrawAnything!

    As you might have noticed The Next Web blog has been growing steadily over the past year.

    February 2008 we generated:
    49,541 pageviews (25,073 unique visitors)

    February 2009 we generated:
    272,991 pageviews (175,020 unique visitors)

    The increase in visitors and pageviews also means that we are getting more interesting for advertisers. We are seeing more and more interest in our 125×125 button in the sidebar here and are spending more time in finding new advertisers now.

    At only €99 a week for 75,000+ pageviews we have a very attractive proposition too.

    We are planning a new blog design with more integrated ads after the conference, which will have room for a larger horizontal banner in the header and a skyscraper in the sidebar.

    So far so good.

    Right now we have an advertiser in the sidebar which you might want to take a look at. It is an ad for a gambling forum. The advertiser asked us if it would be appropriate to advertise on our blog and frankly, we didn’t have an answer.

    In today’s economy you would be a fool to turn away money. On the other hand, we don’t want to show inappropriate ads and scare away our audience. The advertiser, NoLuckNeeded, explained to us that they support responsible gambling and good causes like Earth hour. They do not spam and only promote good online casinos.

    So, where do we go with this? Do we accept ALL advertisers, no matter what they sell? Should we accept only ‘good’ advertisers that fit our audience? Should we just take the money and run? Who can say?

    Your feedback is appreciated, as always…