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This article was published on March 28, 2017

    Congress votes to repeal internet privacy rules TODAY – here’s how to stop them

    Congress votes to repeal internet privacy rules TODAY – here’s how to stop them
    Rachel Kaser
    Story by

    Rachel Kaser

    Internet Culture Writer

    Rachel is a writer and former game critic from Central Texas. She enjoys gaming, writing mystery stories, streaming on Twitch, and horseback Rachel is a writer and former game critic from Central Texas. She enjoys gaming, writing mystery stories, streaming on Twitch, and horseback riding. Check her Twitter for curmudgeonly criticisms.

    A very important vote goes before the US House of Representatives today, and if you have any regard for your online privacy, then you need to contact your Rep now. Here’s the fastest way to do just that.

    You might have heard that the Republican-controlled Senate just voted to repeal the internet’s basic privacy rules. Without these rules, your Internet Service Provider can sell your information to the highest bidder without your knowledge or consent. And if you hadn’t heard yet, I’m sorry to terrify you this early in the morning.

    The vote is going before the House of Representatives today, so this is your last chance to contact your Rep and let them know that you don’t want these rules to go — and you don’t want these rules to go.

    Feeling helpless? Don’t, because there’s an easy way to get on their case about it.

    Countable is a site which gives details on all bills Congress are debating in clear language, while also giving you an easy way to contact your representatives.

    Credit: Countable

    Just go to Countable’s page on the FCC bill and hit “Take Action.” You have the option of using your Facebook account or an email address.

    Email them now. Then email them again. Take these last few hours to let them know in no uncertain terms what you think. If you don’t, they may never know how their constituents really feel about this bill and the effects it will have on the internet.