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This article was published on December 17, 2012

Cards Against Humanity’s ‘Pay-What-You-Want’ sale results in $70,000 donation to Wikipedia

Cards Against Humanity’s ‘Pay-What-You-Want’ sale results in $70,000 donation to Wikipedia
Alex Wilhelm
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Alex Wilhelm

Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected] Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected]

Today Cards Against Humanity announced that its ‘Pay-What-You-Want’ holiday promotion for its card game resulted in a profit of $70,066.27. The company donated that sum to Wikimedia, the parent corporation of Wikipedia.

According to Cards, it sold around 85,000 sets of its game, with the average paid price averaging out to $3.89. The media price was slightly higher, at $5. Nearly 20% of customers were assholes, choosing to not pay at all. Costs for the promotion amounted to $225,762.63. Income totaled to $295,828.90.

The company received a traffic boost of 516.7% as a result of the deal. It most certainly raised its profile in the offing.

The company collected the data on its sale, and generated a number of choice charts. If data is your sort of thing, its post on the matter is more than worth reading. Perhaps most interesting among the infoporn is the following map of the United States, showing what different states paid, on average, for their set of cards:

What’s curious is how states that are geographically close can vary so wildly. Also, it appears that the larger the state in terms of population, the lower the average price paid. This doesn’t hold up absolutely, as poorer states also tended to pay less. Whatever the case, Wyoming wins.

The following clip shows the team writing their five-figure check to Wikimedia. Why did they give the money? Without its existence, the team would not have graduated college they claim. Enjoy:

Top Image Credit: Lindsay Eyink