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Bose’s QuietComfort 45 headphones cancel more noise and last longer

Drown out the world

Bose’s QuietComfort 45 headphones cancel more noise and last longer
Napier Lopez
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Napier Lopez

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Napier Lopez is a writer based in New York City. He's interested in all things tech, science, and photography related, and likes to yo-yo in Napier Lopez is a writer based in New York City. He's interested in all things tech, science, and photography related, and likes to yo-yo in his free time. Follow him on Twitter.

Bose‘s QuietComfort 35 were some of the most popular headphones of the last few years due to their intense noise canceling, cozy design, and solid sound quality (don’t @ me audiophiles).  Today the company released an updated version of the classic, the fittingly-named QuietComfort 45.

The headphones are priced at $329, which puts them a notch below the $380 Bose 700 that was the ostensible successor to the QuietComfort line (they’re also a little cheaper than the QC35 II, which cost $349 at launch). They offer a new noise cancellation system that is better at eliminating mid-range frequencies “typically found in commuter trains, busy office spaces, and cafes”; it sounds like the headphones are better at eliminating chatter, and not just the low rumble of an air conditioner or airplane engine.

Meanwhile, a new (to the QuietComfort line, anyway) ‘Aware’ mode makes it easy to hear your environment and hold conversations without taking the headphones off. It’s a common feature in noise-canceling headphones these days, but it’s still nice to see it properly implemented here.

Credit: Bose

Bose says the QC45 is also using its noise cancelation tech for calls, with beam-forming microphones to isolate your voice while ignoring distractions “like a coffee grinder or barking dog” — actually pretty common background sounds in my own home, not gonna lie.

The design is very much reminiscent of earlier QuietComfort models, with a lightweight plastic design that folds flat for travel. They’re also a good choice for those who prefer physical buttons over touch-sensitive earcups; there are physical buttons to control volume, playback, pairing, and access to features like voice assistants and noise-canceling settings.

As a welcome bonus, the headphones support multi-point pairing (AKA being connected to multiple devices at once), and they can use Bose’s SimpleSync to pair with Bose’s soundbars when you want to watch TV silently. The battery is claimed to last for 24 hours, and the headphones finally charge via USB-C. Thank Goodness.

The headphones are up for pre-order today in both black and off-white colorways and will be available on September 23.

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