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This article was published on October 5, 2010

    Blogger earns Guinness World Record for most posts ever

    Blogger earns Guinness World Record for most posts ever
    Chad Catacchio
    Story by

    Chad Catacchio

    Chad Catacchio is a contributor writing on a variety of topics in tech. He has held management positions at a number of tech companies in th Chad Catacchio is a contributor writing on a variety of topics in tech. He has held management positions at a number of tech companies in the US and China. Check out his personal blog to connect with him or follow him on Twitter (if you dare).

    According to Engadget, the publication’s own Darren Murph – who is obviously the blog’s most frequent writer – has been awarded the first ever Guinness World Record for “most prolific professional blogger” for composing a total of 17,212 posts as of July 29, 2010, which works out to about 11-12 posts per day over four years, assuming Murph wrote every day (which we’re guessing he did).

    Total word count on Engadget: 3,389,148. Apparently, his most prolific day was during CES 2008 when he wrote 59 posts, and Murph, ” intends to defend the title for the rest of his natural life.”

    This got us thinking – will Guinness now start giving out plaques for all kinds of social media? Most tweets ever perhaps? That would be much harder record to keep a hold of than Murph’s most likely, but we’ll reach out to Guinness to see what other social media records are currently held and/or if they have other ones in mind.

    UPDATE: Guinness got back to us and gave us two social media related records: Murph’s and one for the #beatcancer campaign by @thatdrew:

    Most widespread social network message in 24 hours

    The most widespread social networking message was #beatcancer, created by Everywhere and posted 209,771 times on Twitter by different individuals within 24 hours of its first appearance on 17 October 2009.

    Here’s a picture of the certificate that Engadget included in the announcement: