Your sardonic source for consumer tech stories

This article was published on June 22, 2020


Apple’s Developer Transition Kit is a $500 Mac Mini with an ARM chip

Apple’s Developer Transition Kit is a $500 Mac Mini with an ARM chip
Ivan Mehta
Story by

Ivan Mehta

Ivan covers Big Tech, India, policy, AI, security, platforms, and apps for TNW. That's one heck of a mixed bag. He likes to say "Bleh." Ivan covers Big Tech, India, policy, AI, security, platforms, and apps for TNW. That's one heck of a mixed bag. He likes to say "Bleh."

Apple today announced a big and important transition from Intel to its own ARM-based Apple Silicon chips for Macs. Now, the company plans to release its first ARM-based Mac by the end of the year, and the complete transition will take a few years.

However, it wants developers to get started on the platform, so they can port their apps quickly. So, the company is relating a developer transition kit (DTK) in the form of a refurbished Mac Mini.

This Mac Mini will run a special A12Z bionic chip with desktop level architecture, 16GB of RAM, a 512GB SSD, and a variety of Mac I/O ports. 

Developers will have to sign up for a Universal App Quick Start Program to start working on the ARM version of their apps. As a part of this program, they will get this refurbished Mac Mini, access to the beta version of macOS Big Sur 11.0, Xcode 12, documentation, and forums support.

This access to the program will cost them $500 with “the limited use of a DTK.” Which means developers might have to return the kit. However, last time when Apple transition from PowerPC to Intel, they gave out the first Intel-based Mac to developers when they returned the kit. We can expect something similar from the company this time around. 

For more Apple news from WWDC 2020, check out our event page here.

Did you know we have a newsletter all about consumer tech? It’s called Plugged In – and you can subscribe to it right here.

Also tagged with