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This article was published on November 6, 2013

    Apple promises to reintroduce old features to its iWork for Mac apps in the next 6 months

    Apple promises to reintroduce old features to its iWork for Mac apps in the next 6 months Image by: Kevork Djansezian
    Ken Yeung
    Story by

    Ken Yeung

    Ken Yeung is a reporter for The Next Web based in San Francisco, CA. He carries around a big camera & likes to write about tech, startup Ken Yeung is a reporter for The Next Web based in San Francisco, CA. He carries around a big camera & likes to write about tech, startups, parties, and interesting people. Follow him on Twitter, on Facebook, and Google+.

    Apple said today that it’s planning on reintroducing some familiar features for iWork for Mac over the next six months. When the company released the latest app updates last month, some features weren’t available.

    Here’s some of the features Apple says will be added back into iWork for Mac:

    Pages

    • Customize toolbar
    • Vertical ruler
    • Improved alignment guides
    • Improved object placement
    • Import of cells with images
    • Improved word counts
    • Keyboard shortcuts for styles
    • Manage pages and sections from the thumbnail view
    Numbers
    • Customize toolbar
    • Improvements to zoom and window placement
    • Multi-column and range sort
    • Auto-complete text in cells
    • Page headers and footers
    • Improvements to AppleScript support
    Keynote
    • Customize toolbar
    • Restoring old transitions and builds
    • Improvements to presenter display
    • Improvements to AppleScript support

    It is worth noting that these features still remain on your computer, but only through previous iWork app versions. When the next update comes out, users should have all of these capabilities integrated into a single version.

    In October, Apple announced a new 64-bit update for its iWork productivity suite that included a redesigned interface, performance upgrades, and a unified file format for its software. The company even sought to rile up Microsoft by making it free for new device purchasers. Eddy Cue, Apple’s senior vice president of Internet Software and Services, touted the release as being part of the “biggest day for apps” in the company’s history.

    Photo credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

    Hat-tip to Matthew Keys