New images have been taken and rendered of the RMS Titanic, the famous ship that sank on her maiden voyage, taking over one thousand souls to the bottom of the ocean. Dubbed unsinkable before her trip, the Titanic struck an iceberg, snapped in two, and fell to the bottom of the ocean.

Given the depth of the wreck, and its remoteness, securing quality images of the disaster site has been difficult. Happily, fresh images are out in  the April 2012 edition of National Geographic magazine that give a raw perspective on the tradgedy, and its aftermath.

We’ve been given permission to post several of the images. Normally, we don’t place onerous rights information after each image we bring to you, but this time around, the rules are out of our hands, and we really wanted to share these with you. Enjoy.

titanic MM7985 rmst bow 002 520x142 Check out these never before seen, stunning images of the Titanic

COPYRIGHT© 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. The first complete views of the legendary wreck. Ethereal views of Titanic’s bow offer a comprehensiveness of detail never seen before. The optical mosaics each consist of 1,500 high-resolution images rectified using sonar data.

titanic MM7985 rmst Stern 005 520x178 Check out these never before seen, stunning images of the Titanic

COPYRIGHT© 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. The first complete views of the legendary wreckTitanic’s battered stern, captured here in profile, bears witness to the extreme trauma inflicted upon it as it corkscrewed to the bottom.

titanic MM7985 rmst 3D 004 520x328 Check out these never before seen, stunning images of the Titanic

 COPYRIGHT© 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.  Modeling by Stefan Fichtel. Ethereal views of Titanic’s bow (modeled) offer a comprehensiveness of detail never seen before.

titanic MM7985 rmst 003 520x144 Check out these never before seen, stunning images of the Titanic

 COPYRIGHT© 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. The first complete views of the legendary wreck. As the starboard profile shows, the Titanic buckled as it plowed nose-first into the seabed, leaving the forward hull buried deep in mud—obscuring, possibly forever, the mortal wounds inflicted by the iceberg.

titanic MM7985 rmst Eng 007 520x366 Check out these never before seen, stunning images of the Titanic

COPYRIGHT© 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic InstituteTwo of Titanic’s engines lie exposed in a gaping cross section of the stern. Draped in “rusticles”—orange stalactites created by iron-eating bacteria—these massive structures, four stories tall, once powered the largest moving man-made object on Earth.

Like we said, those were worth the hassle. Now get back to work!

NGM 0412 Cvr 21 520x756 Check out these never before seen, stunning images of the Titanic