Yahoo today updated its Transparency Report, revealing it received 21,425 data requests from various law enforcement agencies around the world during the second half of 2013. Those requests impacted a potential 32,493 accounts, according to the company.

Since Yahoo only released its first Transparency Report in September 2013, we can’t compare to see how these results compare to previous years. We can, however, compare against the first half of 2013, as well as get a total for the full year.

The numbers for the second half of last year are slightly lower than those for the first half (29,470 requests affecting 62,775 accounts). For all of 2013, Yahoo thus saw 50,895 government requests impacting a potential 95,268 accounts. Those numbers are quite close to the ones disclosed by Google, which today also released its own report.

We’ve embedded the Transparency Report above so you can check it out in full yourself. Here’s what it contains, according to Yahoo:

  • Government data requests received by Yahoo! Inc. from July 1 to December 31, 2013, including Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) requests, National Security Letters (NSLs), and criminal data requests (such as search warrants, court orders, and subpoenas issued in criminal investigations).
  • More detailed information about the U.S. national security requests we received from January 1 to June 30, 2013, reflecting a new U.S. government policy that lets Internet providers disclose more about these requests. The U.S. government adopted this policy after Yahoo and other Internet companies sued for the right to provide more transparency about the number and kinds of requests we receive.
  • Government data requests received in countries in which Yahoo operates a legal entity.

We’ll keep you posted as Yahoo updates its report every six months.

Yahoo’s Transparency Report

See also – Tumblr announces biannual Transparency Report, says it responded to 76% of 462 requests for user data in 2013 and Pinterest’s first transparency report: 12 government requests for data on 13 accounts in second half of 2013

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