Online collaboration platform Huddle is adding a new option to allow its users to create content from within its mobile and Web application. Called Huddle Note, this new tool allows to allow documents and files to be created without having to use Microsoft Office and directly competes with Box Notes, which has yet to be made generally available.

Starting today, Huddle’s customers will be able to take advantage of a variety of Note features, including being able to create, edit, and share content created from the service. Practically all of the features that you’ll get are those that you’d receive with Google Docs or even other document creation services like Quip.

Huddle Note web screenshot 1 Enterprise team platform Huddle unveils Notes, another alternative to Google Docs and Microsoft Word

Alastair Mitchell, the company’s CEO, said in a statement that people are no longer interested in switching between apps — they want to simplify their workflow: “It’s a leap forward from Jurassic systems such as SharePoint, which doesn’t provide sufficient support for a mobile workforce.”

In a way, Huddle may be in a bit of an advantageous position here — Microsoft customers may view Huddle as having the mobile component necessary to continue working from any device while Box users may opt for Huddle Note because of the social collaboration platform attached to it.

And speaking of mobile, Huddle has also redesigned its mobile app to work with iOS 7 and so it handles documents and rich media in a seamless fashion. The new app includes enhanced notifications, dynamic activity streams (aka News Feed), and improved workflow. Users can sync their files in the background at any time, while also receiving recommendations on documents to work on. Lastly, Huddle enables approvals to be managed in real-time.

Huddle Note iOS Screenshot 1 730x620 Enterprise team platform Huddle unveils Notes, another alternative to Google Docs and Microsoft Word

➤ Huddle for iOS

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