Back in March 2012, smartphone partners Nokia and Microsoft announced that they had co-invested approximately $23 million in AppCampus, an app development program to spur and foster the creation of new innovative apps for Windows Phone, and Nokia platforms like Symbian and Series 40.

Led and managed by Aalto University in Finland, Nokia today announced that the AppCampus program has already funded 41 companies with over $1.2 million in cash. Nokia did not yet reveal which projects were selected.

As Pekka Sivonen, Head of AppCampus, points out, that leaves over $21 million left for what he calls “truly novel ideas that are not yet available”.

Sivonen also reveals that AppCampus has received an impressive 1,000 applications from 64 different countries, providing a glimmer of hope for the still fledgling Windows Phone app ecosystem.

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Aside from giving cash, the amount of which depends on the “complexity and use of backend services such as Nokia Maps, Near Field Communication and imaging”, AppCampus also helps companies with coaching from folks at Nokia and Microsoft, and with basic amenities such as office space or business plan creation.

AppCampus has sponsored the prize for ‘The Most Disruptive Mobile Application Concept’ shown at the TechCrunch Disrupt 2012 conference. The winner, cloud-based identity management system startup Livebolt, received $50,000 and a place in the program. If you fancy, you can apply for AppCampus here.

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