Online eyewear retailer Warby Parker is emerging as a role model for many Internet commerce startups — such as furniture-focused Deal Decor — and the New York based firm looks set to continue its charge after closing a near-$37 million Series B round.

The funding (detailed here) was spotted by Fortune, having gone unnoticed by many as it was disclosed under parent company Jand Inc’s name. From the details available, it appears that General Catalyst Partners has led the round, which will see partner Joel Cutler take a seat on the startup’s board of directors.

What’s particularly interesting is that there is still a remaining $3,199,996 to be sold, which would take the total to $40 million. The company previously raised $12 million in September 2011, after grabbing $1.5 million in seed funding. Existing investors include Lerer Ventures, Tiger Global, First Round Capital and Menlo Ventures.

Thanks to connections in China and no license fees or retailer mark-up, Warby Parker sells a range of designer glasses for $95. That price — combined with free shipping — has helped turn the company into a popular service which is blazing a trail for e-commerce startups in the US and beyond.

The company is yet to formally announce or confirm the new funding, or how it will be used going forward. We’ve reached out for clarification.

Just last week, the company announced plans to launch a ‘mobile showroom’ which will bring a physical Warby Parker presence to nine US cities during a six month period. TNW’s Harrison Weber explains more:

The company is going on a road trip across the US, traveling in a renovated, retrofitted school bus that’s apparently been re-imagined as a professor’s library; complete with leather couches, wood paneling, vintage books and more.

Being a mobile showroom, Warby Parker says the bus will feature a team of eyewear stylists and a full selection of Warby Parker optical and sunwear frames, and a few capsule collections.

Oh, and yes, the company will even cater to your canine eyewear needs.

Further reading: Death to retail: The rise of the online-only brand

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