Finally, an easier way to tag your friends in photos via Google+. Nathan Davis, Software Engineer on the Google+ Photos team, today revealed in a G+ status update that “a fun new feature that will make tagging the people in your photo albums quicker and easier”. It works like this:

“All you have to do is group the photos of each person’s face together and tag them with their name or email address. When you’re done, a notification is sent to each person you tagged. They can decide whether to approve the tags.”

Davis also notes that this new tagging process can be accessed from three different areas on Google+: After creating an album, while adding photos from the sharebox, and when tagging an existing album. Take a peek at the screenshots below.

Tagging1 520x348 Tagging your friends in Google+ Photos just got a whole lot easier Tagging2 520x309 Tagging your friends in Google+ Photos just got a whole lot easier

The new process comes as a welcome and much-anticipated update. When I first joined Google+, my only real complaint was the backseat that photo-upload intuitiveness seemed to take on the service. On July 9th, I posted the following suggestionto my Google+ profile:

“Things I’d like to see on Google+: Mass tagging for photos with face recognition — If you’re anything like me … You probably have a *million* pictures that you need to move over from Facebook. In a situation like this, having to individually tag every photo is incredibly tiring. I’d appreciate the convenience of an updated photo tagging feature.”

Four months later, and here it is! Needless to say, I’m quite happy with the new photo-tagging feature, as I’m sure many other Facebook-transitioners will be as well. Again, it’ always great to see companies continuing to tweak their service in order to encourage more positive user experiences.

For those of you having trouble seeing the updates, AJ Asver, Product Manager on Google+ working on photos, assures us that the feature is still rolling out and should be available soon to all users.

What do you think? Take the new photo tagging process for a test run, then weigh in below with your comments.