Facebook is getting serious about its sticker collection, after it quietly introduced branded stickers from Lego, just days after it added a new like sticker pack for its users.

Unlike Path, Viber and others who sell the large emoticons, the Lego stickers (like the rest of Facebook’s collection) are free to download. The partnership is significant because Lego is arguably the largest brand Facebook has added to its roster thus far, giving further credence to suggestions it will offer paid-for packs in the future.

lego stickers 1 Facebooks latest stickers let you express yourself with Legos beloved minifigures

Lars Silberbauer, Global Director of Social Media at Lego, tells TNW that the move is very much a testing of the waters for the Danish company, which is exploring new ways to help users communicate online. The company is asking for feedback via the Lego Facebook Page or the #legostickers hashtag on Twitter.

“We listen as much as possible on social media, and would like our fans to come with ideas for what they’d like to see in our sticker packs,” he explains.

The lego sticker pack includes a mixture of static and moving characters, such as a dancing chicken, animated robot, weaving boxer, cheerleader and more. Though Lego is hugely popular among kids, Silberbauer says the stickers are for Facebook users aged 13 and up, in accordance with Facebook’s own rules.

lego stickers 2 Facebooks latest stickers let you express yourself with Legos beloved minifigures

These stickers are a lot of fun, but there’s also a serious business here. Stickers have grown into a lucrative revenue stream, particularly in Asia where chat app Line makes more than $10 million per month selling packs. Silberbauer declined to comment when asked if the Facebook deal included money, nor could he confirm if the Lego stickers will make their way to rival chat apps.

You can grab the sticker pack now — you’ll find it under the emoticon tab within Facebook chat window, or at this direct download link.

Related: Stickers: From Japanese craze to global mobile messaging phenomenon

Headline image via Elias Gayles / Flickr