It’s certainly common knowledge that Facebook isn’t just for one specific type of user — it’s for everyone, and the social network company has a responsibility to help make sure that its 1.15 billion users are engaging on the site in the appropriate way. In an age where there has been a high rate of cyber bullying and harassment, Facebook is seeking to help train various groups on how to use the social network.

Today, the company published its Facebook for Educators and Community Leaders Guide, which it hopes will help adults become more supportive of the site and therefore be able to help teenagers and young adults navigate through the social network safely while also making responsible choices.

We’ve all heard tales where teens are harassed in some way on the Internet and parents and teachers are oblivious to what’s going on or simply don’t know enough about how to deal with the situation. As Facebook is an important part of the Internet for many, the company felt that it should shine a light on how responsible adults can show teenagers under their care how to safely use the service.

In this 16-page guide, Facebook explains the behavior between teenagers and social media, what kinds of policies it has in place to police the community, how to report abuse and handle bullying, privacy, and more.

The company says that it didn’t develop the guide on its own — it partnered with several organizations including the Family Online Safety Institute, WiredSafety, ConnectSafely.org, the Girl Scouts of Northern California, the US Council of Catholic Bishops, and more.

Facebook for Educators and Community Leaders is the latest guidebook the social network company has released this year centered around helping to reinforce safety on the Internet and its site. In July, it reached out to domestic abuse victims and last week, it outlined its suicide prevention resources and launched a PSA in the US, Canada, and UK to reinforce the tools it has in place to help.

Facebook for Educators and Community Leaders Guide

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