Quantified self service Human has launched its iOS app to help users track their outdoor activities. With the aim of helping make people “healthier and happier”, the company wants to make sure you’re moving at least 30 minutes or more.

Started by Cardcloud’s former CEO Renato Valdes Olmos and Usabilla’s Paul Veugen, Human follows a similar model to the Nike Fuel band, Fitbit, and Jawbone UP, but instead of having a wearable device, the service tracks your movements with your mobile phone. Olmos told us recently that 75 percent of all Americans haven’t moved more than 10 minutes straight every week. And if you look at your day-to-day activities, you’re really not doing much in terms of activity — commuting to work, sitting at your desk for eight hours, sitting at home watching tv, and going to sleep. In-between all of that, you’re not getting real movement to keep yourself healthy.

human 730x431 Fitness startup Human emerges from stealth with its iOS app to get you moving 30 minutes a day

And it’s not about the “hey, I walked from the couch in my living room to my kitchen” type of movement. It’s more of the type where you leave your house and walk downtown, to the beach, the park, or just to the gym.

From Human’s blog post:

Human tracks all your outdoor activities throughout the day. We focus on outdoor activities, because we don’t count walking to the water cooler as exercise. We want you to get out there and move. Preferably for 10 minutes straight. Three walks of ten minutes already get you to the Daily 30. And Human lets you know when you’ve reached it through a simple push notification.

Like most apps these days, Human has built in game mechanics to encourage you to try and become more active, similar to Nike’s Fuel band.

See related: Stealth fitness startup Human wants to make the quantified self mainstream

Human for iOS

Photo credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images

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