Apple’s request for an injunction against eight of Samsung’s smartphones has been pushed back from an original date of September 20 to December 6, Reuters reports. The September 20 meeting has instead been repurposed to decide whether to remove the sales ban on the Galaxy Tab 10.1.

According to the report, U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh decided on the extra time because of the size of Apple’s request. Apple filed its request on Monday, seeking bans on several models of the Galaxy S and Galaxy S2, as well as the Droid Charge and the Galaxy Prevail.

Last week, a jury awarded $1.05 billion in damages to Apple after finding Samsung guilty of infringement. The ruling was a massive victory for Apple, which was not found to have infringed any of its competitor’s patents.

Samsung did, however, pick up a minor win, as its Galaxy Tab 10.1 did not infringe a design patent asserted against the device for a preliminary injunction. As such, Samsung has appealed to have the ban removed.

In a memo to employees, Apple CEO Tim Cook called its lawsuit against Samsung a matter of “values” and noted that evidence showed its rival’s copying had actually gone farther than originally suspected. In its defense, Samsung published an internal memo saying that it, unlike Apple, is prioritizing innovation over litigation.

Google has even weighed in, declaring that the most of the patents involved in the case don’t relate to the “core” Android operating system. “We work with our partners to give consumers innovative and affordable products, and we don’t want anything to limit that,” the company said.

For more on Apple v. Samsung check out:

Samsung’s legal team in hot water for publicly releasing inadmissible evidence from Apple patent trial

Day 1: Leaky evidence, secret prototypes and kitchen tables

Day 2: Schiller, Forstall testify on creation, sales and hardships of iPhone project

Day 4 preview: The iPhone and iPad may feel obvious, but they weren’t inevitable

Apple’s argument that Samsung copied its software designs, summed up by a single yellow flower

Apple v. Samsung closing arguments: ‘Make your own phones’ v. ‘Apple is trying to mislead you’

Image credit: TNW