Create the minds running the machines with this Python Machine Learning training — and pay what you want

Create the minds running the machines with this Python Machine Learning training — and pay what you ...

This week in “The Robots are Taking Over the World,” TNW’s own Rachel Kaser let us know that Yelp is now using machine learning to scan Yelp restaurant comments and compile lists of each eatery’s most popular dishes.

Sure, maybe it isn’t an earth-shaking development, but hardly a day goes by without news of new innovations and expanding horizons courtesy of AI and the advancements of machine learning. As a result, experts in artificial intelligence and its most affiliated programming language Python have lots of career options.

Understand machine learning and all the ways it can launch your new career with this Total Python Machine Learning course bundle — and you can even name your price for it.

Any purchase will get you access to one of the courses: An Easy Introduction To Recommendation Systems. It examines how data analysis using Python help websites determine and serve up suggestions like possible friends on Facebook or videos you should watch on Netflix.

Obviously, that’s just for starters though, so by matching the average price paid by other customers, you’ll get seven more machine learning courses, including:

  • An Easy Introduction To Python (a $99.99 value)
  • Advanced Deep Learning With Neural Networks (a $99.99 value)
  • An Easy Introduction To Deep Learning On The Google Cloud ML Engine (a $99.99 value)
  • An Easy Introduction To Unsupervised Deep Learning (a $99.99 value)
  • An Easy Introduction To AI And Deep Learning (a $99.99 value)
  • An Introduction To Machine Learning And NLP in Python (a $99.99 value)
  • An Easy Introduction To Machine Learning Using Scikit-Learn (a $99.99 value)

This package will get you in on one of the unquestioned growth centers of the tech world with AI/machine learning training at virtually any price you want to pay.

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