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This article was published on October 2, 2012

    Valve is no longer just about games: Software is now available on Steam

    Valve is no longer just about games: Software is now available on Steam
    Emil Protalinski
    Story by

    Emil Protalinski

    Emil was a reporter for The Next Web between 2012 and 2014. Over the years, he has covered the tech industry for multiple publications, incl Emil was a reporter for The Next Web between 2012 and 2014. Over the years, he has covered the tech industry for multiple publications, including Ars Technica, Neowin, TechSpot, ZDNet, and CNET. Stay in touch via Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

    As expected, Valve today started selling software on Steam, moving its online store catalog beyond just games. If you can’t wait to see what’s out there, the link you want is store.steampowered.com/software.

    You may be a little disappointed, however, as there are currently just seven apps available, though we’re sure more will be added soon enough (just don’t hold your breath waiting):

    As you can see, all of the apps are already being discounted (except for the free one, of course) by 10 percent. The most expensive piece of software for Windows will set you back $89.10.

    That’s right; so far all the software is only available for Windows, although Valve also has plans to offer Mac options. Furthermore, many of the apps will feature Steamworks integraton, including features such as automatic updating and Steam Cloud saves that let you save your work so that your files and software state go with you, or at least wherever you have Steam installed.

    Valve first announced plans to move into the non-game software world back in August. Some suggested that the reveal would mean game developers would be able to use Steam for building games from start to finish: starting with the development and design software all the way to the actual distribution of the final product.

    The software above suggests this is indeed the case, yet we’re sure as the list of apps grows, it will soon become clear that Valve wants to use Steam to offer all types of software, for all types of users. Right now Valve has beat Microsoft to the punch as Windows 8, and the included app store, ships on October 26. Once Mac software arrives, Valve will also have to compete with Apple’s Mac App Store.

    See also: Valve launches Greenlight, lets you pick which games come to Steam

    Image credit: manting