Rub shoulders with leading experts and industry disruptors at TNW Conference →

Inside money, markets, and Big Tech

This article was published on June 9, 2008


Twiddict: methadon for Twitter addicts

Twiddict: methadon for Twitter addicts
Ernst-Jan Pfauth
Story by

Ernst-Jan Pfauth

Ernst-Jan Pfauth is the former Editor in Chief of Internet at NRC Handelsblad, as well as an acclaimed technology author and columnist. He a Ernst-Jan Pfauth is the former Editor in Chief of Internet at NRC Handelsblad, as well as an acclaimed technology author and columnist. He also served as The Next Web’s blog’s first blogger and Editor in Chief, back in 2008. At De Correspondent, Ernst-Jan serves as publisher, fostering the expansion of the platform.

@robinwauters, @tomklaasen, @tijs, and @atog are Twitter addicts. So every time there’s “something technically wrong” on their beloved microblogging service, their world crashes into them. Basically a cold turkey is awaiting these guys every single damn day, over and over again. They HAD to find a solution, as their dealers Evan Williams and Biz Stone haven’t proved to be very helpful so far. So they used the last strength in their Twitter-tortured bodies to find a way to cope with this destructive life style. Well, in the end, these junkies found one and – self-conscious as they are – called it Twiddict.

One of the addicts used a probably stolen laptop to email me some background about Twiddict:

The way it works, is pretty straightforward: users can log in to their Twitter account and use Twiddict to keep sending their messages as they are used to. Twiddict then continuously pings the Twitter API to see if it’s up again, and routes the stored messages back as soon as it’s stable.

To see it in action, go to Twiddict and log in with your Twitter account details. Don’t worry, these guys are “maniacally protective of users’ data”. Sure, like you take an addict’s word for granted.