Want to keep the TNW Conference vibe going?? Tickets for TNW2022 are available now >>

The heart of tech

This article was published on September 14, 2015

The White House is using open data to help you shortlist US colleges

The White House is using open data to help you shortlist US colleges
Abhimanyu Ghoshal
Story by

Abhimanyu Ghoshal

Managing Editor

Abhimanyu is TNW's Managing Editor, and is all about personal devices, Asia's tech ecosystem, as well as the intersection of technology and Abhimanyu is TNW's Managing Editor, and is all about personal devices, Asia's tech ecosystem, as well as the intersection of technology and culture. Hit him up on Twitter, or write in: [email protected].

If you’re planning to apply to universities in the US next year, The White House’s redesigned College Scorecard site is a good place to start shortlisting schools.

Using open data and an easy-to-use interface, the resource lets you quickly look up universities by location, size and programs.

The redesigned College Scorecard site uses open data to help find the right school for you
The redesigned College Scorecard site uses open data to help find the right school for you

It also lets you drill down to outcomes at specific colleges, including how much you can expect to accrue in debt and how soon you’ll be able to pay it off.

You can also find stats for specific schools, such as typical SAT and ACT scores, the most popular programs available and a breakdown of the student body.

The new site lets you check out detailed stats for over 7,000 US schools
The new site lets you check out detailed stats for over 7,000 US schools

The team behind the new site used open data that covers over 7,000 colleges and goes back 18 years. It’s all available via an API for researchers, counselors and developers to use in their own applications and analysis.

Overall, this is a handy tool for looking up unbiased information on which US schools suit your needs best.

Fact Sheet: Empowering Students to Choose the College that is Right for Them [The White House Briefing Room via Engadget]

Image credit:  Bruno Marinho