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This article was published on June 30, 2014


Samsung’s new low-end smartphones offer Android 4.4 and its redesigned TouchWiz skin

Samsung’s new low-end smartphones offer Android 4.4 and its redesigned TouchWiz skin Image by: AFP/Getty Images
Nick Summers
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Nick Summers

Nick Summers is a technology journalist for The Next Web. He writes on all sorts of topics, although he has a passion for gadgets, apps and Nick Summers is a technology journalist for The Next Web. He writes on all sorts of topics, although he has a passion for gadgets, apps and video games in particular. You can reach him on Twitter, circle him on Google+ and connect with him on LinkedIn.

It’s almost impossible to keep up with Samsung’s ever-expanding smartphone portfolio. Unfortunately, the problem only deepened today after the company unveiled four new low-end smartphones with equally forgettable names and spec-sheets.

First out the blocks is the Galaxy Core II, which features a 4.5-inch WVGA display, quad-core 1.2GHz processor and 2,000mAh battery. Sliding underneath is the slightly less powerful Galaxy Ace 4, which offers a smaller 4-inch panel, dual-core 1.2GHz processor, 1,800 mAh battery and LTE connectivity. A 3G variant is also available with a 1GHz processor and 1,500 mAh battery.

Samsung Galaxy Core II
Samsung Galaxy Core II

Dropping even further into budget-territory is the Galaxy Young 2, a petite smartphone with a 3.5-inch HGVA display, single-core 1.0GHz processor and 1,300 mAh battery. It’s followed by the Galaxy Star 2, which is exactly the same save for a lower-resolution 2-megapixel camera.

Galaxy Star 2
Galaxy Star 2

The only morsel of information worth remembering here? All of the above run on Android 4.4 (KitKat) and the latest version of Samsung’s TouchWiz skin, which is arguably its best take on Google’s mobile OS to date. It’s also worth noting that pricing and availability is yet to be announced for all four handsets.

While none of these devices are particularly memorable, they all serve a specific purpose. By offering a handset at every possible price-point and configuration, it means customers will always be considering Samsung hardware, regardless of their pay-as-you-go setup or monthly contract.

Featured image credit: JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/GettyImages

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