Join us at TNW Conference 2021 for insights into the future of tech →

The heart of tech

This article was published on November 6, 2013


    Retweets are the new unread books

    Retweets are the new unread books
    Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten
    Story by

    Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten

    CEO and co-founder, TNW

    Boris is a serial entrepreneur who founded not only TNW, but also V3 Redirect Services (sold), HubHop Wireless Internet Provider (sold), and Boris is a serial entrepreneur who founded not only TNW, but also V3 Redirect Services (sold), HubHop Wireless Internet Provider (sold), and pr.co. Boris is very active on Twitter as @Boris and Instagram: @Boris.

    Last weekend I talked to a friend and referenced an anecdote I had read. He looked confused, so I told him I read it in an article he tweeted earlier that day. His reply “Oh yeah, I retweeted it because I thought it would be an interesting article, but I didn’t click through.”

    I was surprised for a moment but then realized I often do the same. I’ll see a title for a page and think ‘That must be interesting for some of my followers’ and then I will retweet it unseen. Somehow that feels weird though. Usually I just assume that people will have read an article before they retweet it. But I also know this isn’t true as I’ve seen posts in the past on this blog that for a short while had more retweets than unique visitors.

    In a way this practice reminds me of old-fashioned bookshelves with impressive books on them that you haven’t actually read, but which you think make you look smart. Take a look at your bookshelf and tell me you’ve read every book on there. Honestly now!

    So tell me, do you ever retweet something, a quote or URL, simply to make yourself look smarter, hipper and more up-to-date than you actually are?

    Oh who am I kidding, you aren’t even reading this post. You’ve probably only retweeted it…