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This article was published on January 29, 2016

Reddit on Android is now in beta and should launch ahead of iOS

Reddit on Android is now in beta and should launch ahead of iOS Image by: evablue
Kirsty Styles
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Kirsty Styles

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Kirsty Styles is a journalist who lives in Hackney. She was previously editor at Tech City News and is now a reporter at The Next Web. She l Kirsty Styles is a journalist who lives in Hackney. She was previously editor at Tech City News and is now a reporter at The Next Web. She loves tech for good, cleantech, edtech, assistive tech, politech (?), diversity in tech.

Reddit’s cofounder Steve Huffman, back in the driving seat after Ellen Pao’s resignation last year, has taken to the platform to outline some of his plans for 2016.

Among them is an attempt to “modernize Reddit,” which includes the launch of both an Android and iOS app.

The Android app is now in private beta, with early testers saying that while it doesn’t offer anything mind-blowing given the range of third-party apps out there, and there are a few bits missing, it’s great to get something official.

Having remained largely unchanged since it launched a decade ago, the company has now created an A/B testing feature and will be trying out new things on the site in order to “understand why Reddit works for some people, but not for others.”

Huffman also celebrated a number of wins from 2015 in his post, including the successful outlawing of “involuntary pornography” from the site, an example that was followed by Google and Twitter.

The company outlined a range of other content restrictions for its users last year too, something that re-emphasized statements made by Huffman and his team about their commitment to freedom of expression, with some caveats.

He said 2016 will see the company produce its first transparency report, slated for March 2016, so it can be more clear with users about how it deals with the “many requests from law enforcement and governments.”

Reddit in 2016 [Reddit via Engadget]

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