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This article was published on January 3, 2014


Noted: A beautifully simple gesture-based note-taking app for iPhone

Noted: A beautifully simple gesture-based note-taking app for iPhone
Paul Sawers
Story by

Paul Sawers

Paul Sawers was a reporter with The Next Web in various roles from May 2011 to November 2014. Follow Paul on Twitter: @psawers or check h Paul Sawers was a reporter with The Next Web in various roles from May 2011 to November 2014. Follow Paul on Twitter: @psawers or check him out on Google+.

With the likes of Evernote, Simplenote and Drafts long-established in the note-taking app realm, any new entrant to the busy space really has its work cut out for it before things have even started.

But Denver-based development agency Tack has recently entered the fray with Noted, a beautiful, gesture-based note-taking app for iPhone.

How it works

Feature wise, Noted is about as simple as things get. This is no Evernote-killer, but it doesn’t pretend to be – it’s all about the interaction, with swiping very much the order of the day. Pull down to create a new note, and hand-pick your color of choice.

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With multiple notes, you simply swipe to the side to peruse your various pieces, or pinch to view all your notes together.

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Want to delete a note? Drag your two fingers to the left and it’ll disappear as if by magic.

       

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You can also share specific notes by email, SMS or Twitter, or copy the contents to your clipboard to include in another application.

If you already have your note-taking tool of choice, Noted probably won’t sway you. But if you’re on the look out for a lovely little app that pays a lot of attention to design and usability, it’s certainly worth your time.

Noted is available to download for free now. Meanwhile, you can read a little more about the app’s history and design process over on Tack’s blog here.

Noted