Crypto & fintech

This article was published on February 4, 2022

You’re all wrong: NFT is actually pronounced ‘nay-fey-tay’

We're just trying to avoid another GIF/JIF debate


You’re all wrong: NFT is actually pronounced ‘nay-fey-tay’
Callum Booth
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Callum Booth

Editor of Plugged by TNW

Callum is an Englishman in Amsterdam, but not in the way you're thinking. He's the Editor of Plugged, TNW's consumer tech vertical. He w Callum is an Englishman in Amsterdam, but not in the way you're thinking. He's the Editor of Plugged, TNW's consumer tech vertical. He writes about gear, gadgets, and apps — with a particular focus on Apple — and also makes the occasional odd video. Basically, he's halfway between an abrasive gadget nerd and thinky art boy.

Let’s get this straight: NFT is pronounced “nay-fey-tay.” That’s all there is to it.

You might have read Corin Faife at the Verge claiming it should be said as “neft” — but they’re wrong. It’s nay-fey-tay. Forever and ever, nay-fey-tay.

I can see where Faife is coming from, I really can. “Neft” is an elegant solution to saying those three letters. As it doesn’t appear NFTs are going anywhere, this pronunciation approach would save us all a lot of time.

But here’s my issue: why should we have an elegant solution for something that’s inherently serpentine and torturous?

Uh oh, hope the “owners” of these digital images don’t mind that I right-clicked them.

Let’s go back to basics.

NFTs (or non-fungible tokens) are built on the same tech as cryptocurrencies — a highly questionable technology in its own right.

I’ve yet to see evidence of crypto being more than gambling or an elaborate ponzi scheme. Despite that, I still live in hope that one day, far off into the future, it may actually achieve its goal of decentralizing finance in a way that benefits the many, rather than the few it currently does.

But we’re still a long way from that. And, of course, this is to say nothing of its environmental impact.

I hold none of this hope for NFTs. It’s as though a malevolent scientist cobbled together the worst parts of cryptocurrencies to create the shittiest, bro-iest monster imaginable. And, by mighty incel-Cthulhu, they did.

If you’re hungry for an in-depth analysis of the failings of NFTs, I suggest you watch this Folding Ideas video.

But if you don’t have that sort of time? Here’s the short version: NFTs don’t do what they promise and are simply a tool for creating artificial scarcity. And, with that, making a lot of cash for the people at the top of the pyramid.

This is why NFT must be pronounced “nay-fey-tay”

“Neft” (or even “NFT”) provides too much validation for such a shitshow. They sound official — or even worse, important. This cannot stand.

In fact, I don’t even think “nay-fey-tay” by itself does it justice. That’s why I need to teach you how to pronounce it properly.

On first inspection, you may presume nay-fey-tay contains three syllables. WRONG. There are actually six of them in there.

Listen, you can’t just hop through each syllable, you’ve got to savor them, roll them in your mouth, use your vocal chords to reach for the stars.

It should sound something like: “nay-ayyy-feyy-eyy-tayy-ayyyy.”

Go on, give it a go. You won’t regret it.

And that, friends, is the correct way to pronounce NFT (nay-ayyy-feyy-eyy-tayy-ayyyy).

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