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This article was published on July 10, 2014

MindRDR for Google Glass lets you take photos just by thinking, but there’s a drawback

MindRDR for Google Glass lets you take photos just by thinking, but there’s a drawback
Ben Woods
Story by

Ben Woods

Europe Editor

Ben is a technology journalist with a specialism in mobile devices and a geeky love of mobile spectrum issues. Ben used to be a professional Ben is a technology journalist with a specialism in mobile devices and a geeky love of mobile spectrum issues. Ben used to be a professional online poker player. You can contact him via Twitter or on Google+.

With Glass becoming available to a wider audience and a general buzz around anything wearable in tech, the number of apps set to become available for the specs can only continue to increase.  But the promise of one that lets you navigate Glass’s UI and carry out actions simply by thinking about it has got to be one of the most exciting possibilities on the horizon. There is, however, one problem.

The first version of MindRDR‘s app from design studio This Place will live up to that promise – you can take a photo using Glass and share it on Facebook or Twitter just by thinking about it. It’s available to download now if you’ve already shelled out $1,500/£1,000 for a Google Glass unit but in order to use the free app, you’ll also need a Neurosky MindWave EEG headset, which costs €89.

It’s early days, so functionality is understandably a bit limited – the EEG headset measures four senses of a possible 18 in the brain, for example – but in future, it promises to let you interact with a whole lot more digital content and services simply by measuring your brainwaves and interpreting them into an action.

This all sounds pretty exciting, but there’s a downside as things stand today, you’ll look like this out in public:

MindRDR_InUse

Of course, if you’re happy to wander around with multiple devices strapped to your head in order to take a photo, there’s no problem at all.

Slight facetiousness aside, the hardware will undoubtedly continue to be refined and shrunk and the possible uses are endless, but the reality right now is that if you want to experience the cutting-edge of tech, you have to be willing to stand out from the crowd, for better or worse. And for most people, that will probably prove too much of a hurdle to get over for something like taking a picture.

➤ This Place | MindRDR [Github]