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This article was published on October 6, 2011

Microsoft previews October’s Patch Tuesday

Microsoft previews October’s Patch Tuesday
Alex Wilhelm
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Alex Wilhelm

Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected] Alex Wilhelm is a San Francisco-based writer. You can find Alex on Twitter, and on Facebook. You can reach Alex via email at [email protected]

It’s that time of the month again, the moment in which Microsoft unveils what will be contained in the forthcoming installment of Patch Tuesday. As always, today’s release is an ‘Advance Notification,’ with the actual fixes coming along shortly.

This time around, the final code will drop on October 11th, so mark the date on your calendars. There will be a total of 8 bulletins in October’s patch batch, two of which are marked as ‘critical,’ with the rest deemed simply ‘important.’ The two critical updates impact, between them, .Net, Silverlight, Windows, and Internet Explorer. In other words, they will find wide application.

On a happier note, only the critical bulletin that deals with Windows and Internet Explorer requires a restart. The remaining 6 bulletins deal mainly with Windows, but one apiece take on the Forefront Unified Access Gateway and Microsoft Host Integration Server. This remains a mostly Windows related month. The 8 bulletins correct a total of 23 vulnerabilities.

Compared to September, this is a relatively heavy patch set. Last month only 5 bulletins were released, none of which were labeled as ‘critical.’ Also, in the last set, only two bulletins dealt with Windows. For October the figure is 5.

Continuing the conspiracy theory, Microsoft has maintained the trend (that has gone on for most of the year now) of releasing a heavy patch set, followed by a light edition, following by a heavy, and so forth. If the trend holds, November’s patch event should be relaxed indeed. If not, we will have only been dealt a contentedly recurring fluke. As always, you can find the nitgrit here, if you need the complete set of information.